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The Center's Harry S. Ashmore talks about the longstanding tradition of liberalism in the South, as well as the distinguished newspapers -- and newsmen -- which have reflected that tradition, at times at great sacrifice. He also discusses the current…

John W. Macy, Jr., former president of the Public Broadcasting Corporation, gives a step-by-step account of the process by which public broadcasting was established, flourished, and was finally brought to its present enfeebled state. Featuring Harry…

In this panel discussion, the participants speculate on ways the television system could be made more accessible to the full range of opinions, and therefore more democratic, so that people do not find it necessary to resort to bizarre, violent, or…

A discussion in response to exiled South African journalist Ronald M. Segal's proposal in favor of local control over television program content. Featuring Harry S. Ashmore, Lloyd Cutler, James Loper, Fred Warner Neal, Lawrence Rogers, Antonin…

An examination of subtler forms of control over the press than overt government censorship, such as intimidation and manipulation through regulatory agencies like the FCC. Featuring Harry S. Ashmore, Rick J. Carlson, John Cogley, Reuven Frank, Norton…

A discussion revolving around whether the First Amendment gives broadcasters the right to be unfair, and what the proper relationship between the government and the media should be. Featuring Harry S. Ashmore, Rick J. Carlson, Harry Kalven, Fred…

In this panel discussion, the participants analyze the possibility of creating a private, independent organization charged with evaluating American media performance in order to assure responsible and accurate television news, an approach that has…

A panel discussion that examines the quality of the people chosen to execute our foreign policy and their relationship with media reporters as critical variables in the workings of our government. Featuring Alfred Balk, Thomas E. Cronin, John Kenneth…

A panel discussion that examines the quality of the people chosen to execute our foreign policy and their relationship with media reporters as critical variables in the workings of our government. Featuring Alfred Balk, Thomas E. Cronin, John Kenneth…

Sociologist Bernard Rosenberg argues that television destroys our aesthetic discrimination, thereby dulling our capacity to either create or respond to art, and distracts us from confronting our human condition. Norman Cousins, editor and author,…